Digital Vs Film Photography: A Graphic Designer’s Dilemma  

 Digital Vs Film Photography: A Graphic Designer’s Dilemma

 

To be a graphic designer in the fast-paced professional design world takes a lot of creativity, and plenty of savvy technical skills. To name a few, a graphic designer must know a lot about web interfaces, typography, sketching, and Film Photography apparel professionalism when dealing with employers or clients. Aside from all of these skills, these days graphic designers have been incorporating photography into their work more and more. In fact, photography classes have even become a staple in most graphic design degree programs. However, a graphic design school student begins to learn about photography, how are they to know the advantages and disadvantages of shooting film photography vs. digital photography? Below is a thorough breakdown of the benefits and pitfalls of both photography mediums.

The truth is that film came first. Film cameras have obviously been around for much longer than digital ones. In fact, the first image was captured on film in 1826 by a French scientist named Joseph Niépce. Since then, film has come a long way. In the early 1900’s the first film cameras were mass-produced and made available to the general public. Since then, cameras have become regular household items for the masses. Though digital photography has risen in popularity since the 20th century, many people still prefer to shoot with film for many reasons. First off, film is rather easy to obtain. If you have a solid camera, you can pop into just about any chain drugstore and buy rolls of film to load your camera with.

You can also buy a disposable film camera for just about the same price as a pack of film. Secondly, many argue that the quality of image on film negatives is higher than the average digital camera’s image quality. Additionally, negatives are light and easily stored, and if you keep them in a small box you have access to reprint your photos whenever you want. When you keep negatives, you have physical copies of your images that don’t take up digital space, and aren’t in danger of being lost if a hard drive or a computer crashes. You can also scan your negatives onto a computer if you should wish to store them that way. Film images often come out with extremely saturated color and an old-fashioned looking, grainy touch. Graphic design school students might find that they can use this old-fashioned effect to their advantage when working with photography images.

 

 

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